Stephen Van Wyck

Stephen Van Wyck Pocket Watch

Stephen Van Wyck Pocket Watch

Stephen Van Wyck was listed as a silversmith, clock and watchmaker in New York City directories from 1796-1825. However, it is apparent that he was working in the trade well prior to 1796, minimally by 1792, based upon surviving watches. Van Wyck's shop was located at 267 Pearl Street, just a few doors from the well known Effingham Embree. Upon Embree's retirement in 1797, he continued business at Embree’s location advertising in the New-York Daily Advertiser (May 26, 1797) “successor to Effingham Embree, No. 275 Pearl Street” (Ganczarczyk, 734-741).

Stephan Van Wyck Watchmaker

Stephaen Van Wyck Watch

Movements having both plain (verge) and horizontal (cylinder) escapements signed by Stephen Van Wyck are known. This verge watch is signed Stephen Van Wyck, New York serial number 104 and is nicely finished with round pillars, a white enamel dial and gold hands.

Contract Watch

IG Case Maker's Mark for Joseph Glenny

The silver pair cases have London assay letter for 1795-96 and maker's mark "IG" for Joseph Glenny. The number "104" is also stamped on the inner case following the 1785 Statute that specified that the watch case contain the number of the watch movement (Priestley, 28); however, this provision was inconsistently followed.

The cases also have a King George III export duty mark that was used from 1786 to 1798 and indicates that the tax was paid on the silver cases. It is interesting to note that the case maker is the same London silversmith as found on the Nathaniel Hawxhurst and Thomas Demilt watches, two other New York makers working at about the same time.

William Scott Silversmith
Van Wyck Silversmith

Watch paper by William Scott, of Paterson, N.J. located within the case. Stephen Van Wyck's watch paper also displayed for reference.

Additional References and recommended reading:

  • Jerzy Ganczarczyk, Stephen Van Wyck English Cylinder Watches, NAWCC Watch & Clock Bulletin, No. 317, (December, 1998), pp. 734-741

  • Philip Priestley, Early Watch Case Makers of England 1631– 1720, NAWCC Watch & Clock Bulletin Special Order Supplement No. 3 (2000)